Commuters

   of missoula

Missoula In Motion has launched a story-telling series called Commuters of Missoula featuring every day Missoulians that have incorporated sustainable transportation into their lives. Commuters of Missoula features individuals who are frequent bikers, walkers, busers and carpoolers as well as those who just do it once and a while!  

 

Whether you're a winter biker or a once a month bus rider, we'd love to chat! Please consider nominating yourself or a friend

BIKING, BUSING AND WALKING WITH RACHEL

"I grew up in Potomac right on the Blackfoot River so we were pretty dependent on driving places. When I lived in Oregon I had a commute, I lived about 30 minutes away from my job. But since I’ve been back in Missoula, I’ve lived close to everything. I used to live on 5th Street and work at the University so I would take the bus pretty frequently or bike or walk. I would drive sometimes but four years ago, it became a news year resolution, I said “I’m not going to drive to work

anymore”. And I haven't since. I care about the environment and I hate parking. I have a little 2-door Honda civic and it’s a great car but I wanted the challenge and wanted to combat the laziness and compliance of driving. I couldn’t ignore how easy it was to not drive. I have free busses, I can walk, I can bike. I don’t need to drive”.

“I just bought a house on the Northside and it’s wonderful, I love it so much. I work for Destination Missoula so that’s about a 20 minute walk from my place. I can also catch the bus, which is about a block and a half from my house and get dropped off at the transfer center. Or I can walk or bike. I take the pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks and feel like I’m going to die every time, no matter how many times I’ve done it! There’s a little mental game I’ve started to play to get over it like “okay remember to breathe on every 3rd pedal”. I’m glad it’s there but it’s such a rough bridge! I have a cute little cruiser which is very tippy. I also work at Big Sky Break Out on the Northside on the weekends which is about a 2 minute bike ride or a 5 minute walk. The bus I take is Route 3 which is once an hour so I really have to be on it in the mornings. If I miss the bus though, luckily I can just walk and only be a few minutes late to work. Thankfully all my employers have been really accommodating and flexible and appreciate that I use sustainable modes.”

“In the warm weather I bike a lot more- it’s faster and feels really good. In the cold weather I pretty exclusively bus. I will walk depending on if it's a nice day. I usually go home for lunch because I have two cats so I like to give them some attention. So I’ll take the bus to work and then I’ll walk home and back to work and then I’ll catch the bus back home again. I put my bike away in mid-September and I’ve been busing pretty consistently since then and it’s been really fine and comfortable with COVID and all. Route 3 isn’t too crowded, I think the most there’s been has been maybe 10 people. If it were a lot more crowded, I’d be a little more nervous but that hasn’t happened. There are a lot of people that ride the same bus route as me and there isn’t necessarily a lot of conversation but there’s that recognition of being regulars and knowing where our stops are which is really nice. There have been several times where it’s just me and the driver. I just relax and read my book.”

“I love working with international students and people. It really just fills me up. I remember I was interviewing for a job at Portland State University and when I met with the Director he gave me some really good advice. He said, “leave work at work. This field, the burnout and compassion fatigue is so high. You have to be able to put it down and know that there are other good people in the field who will help support the students and if you do that, you will be able to contribute longer.” That really stuck with me. What I love about a commute in the morning is it gives you that time to wake up and sit with your thoughts. And the end of the day you have time to debrief so when you get home you’ve had time to come down. Busing, biking and walking provide that time and I love that.”

“Considering the environment has become such a part of my thinking that I almost don’t even think about it any more. My parents met in Barrow Alaska in a dry village which was 500 miles away from the nearest road so they rode snowmobiles everywhere. My dad was always super outdoorsy and connected to nature. He was a teacher and an elementary school principal in Potomac so as soon as school was out he would get in his van with his dog and canoe and go to Canada for 3 months and backpack everywhere. And growing up on the Blackfoot River and having that as my backyard really influenced me. And now the people I surround myself with are pretty conscientious about our waste. I was one of the first Soil Cycle customers to sign up and I have a big vegetable garden. Living on the Northside has been such a wonderful community to be a part of. Like I actually know my neighbors and I have really, really cool neighbors. Knowing and living in a community makes you think about how your actions impact everyone else. When you know the people and feel connected to your neighbors, you want to do better for them. Plus I know I’m going to feel better at the end of the day if I bike or walk or bus. I’m going to be sitting in an office for most of the day and I really don't want to sit in a car and deal with parking.”

“If it’s the autonomy piece that people are so attached to with cars they have to realize that there can be other things besides cars that provide autonomy. Like you can have autonomy with a bike, you can use your feet! But cars are just so ingrained in the American psyche. Like you think about how it’s presented culturally in so many coming of age things. For example you get a car at 16, you see the commercials of the dad giving his daughter a new set of car keys. Getting a car is this huge symbol of growing up and being your own person in America. When talking with friends or coworkers I try my best to use positive reinforcement and explain to them why it feels so great not depending on my car. Getting people excited about something, helping them realize all the ways it improves my day.”

“I live in midtown, near the Southgate Mall and take the Milwaukee or Bitterroot trail just about everywhere. One of the reasons I probably ride my bike a lot is because my dad has always rode bikes. Him and I ride on the Bitterroot Trail quite a bit.I just bought my condo in the fall and I had my eyes specifically on that one. I‘d looked at other condos in other places and there are lots available out on Mullan Road. I specifically chose my place in large part because of its central location. But I totally get that finances come in to play and can really dictate where folks live. I looked for condos downtown and they were way too expensive. But there are still places around town that are near bike paths that are more affordable than directly downtown. I think midtown is going to continue to develop. I really value how easy it is to get to places like the new Bridge and Dram Shop.

BIKING/RIDING THE BUS WITH KRIS

I’ve been primarily sustainably commuting since 2006. The decision was based mostly out of convenience. Where I’ve lived and where I’ve worked, there’s usually an easy way for me to partially use a bike path, partially use a big wide sidewalk or partially use a broad shoulder. If I hadn’t had that, it would have been more difficult for me to bike for sure. I was trying to be active and I enjoy riding my bike. My advice to encourage others to bike and walk more, is to find paths and routes that lend themselves to fewer cars and less traffic. When I try going back to driving, it actually feels like more of an inconvenience.

During the winter, as soon as there’s ice, I choose to walk rather than ride my bike. I also started to ride the bus a lot, especially when zero fare started. My girlfriend and I worked together and she rode the bus so in the winter time, I was like “okay, I guess I’ll ride the bus too.” It’s really how we first got to know each other. It was an opportunity to be in the same place and connect and talk.Also, when I rode the bus from my old place, I met two older woman that I got to know. We always ended up on the same get on point and the same get off point. I hadn't ridden the bus for a while, in over a year probably, and when I did again, sure enough, I saw one of them again. I got to catch up with her and she said “Oh yea, Sharon asked about you, she was wondering if you sold your house. Biking and busing builds community I think. You have the choice of chatting with who’s sitting next to you or putting in your ear buds and just zoning out. Plus, my uncle Mark drives the bus I ride.” 

BIKING WITH PATRICK

“I live on the edge of Westside, over by Draught Works, and I work in the Florence Building. I’ve primarily biked or walked in Missoula since I’d say 2008. I’ve always just enjoyed biking- even when I’ve hated my job and had horrible days at work. Sometimes the best parts of my days have been biking to and from work. I don’t hate my job anymore but ya know, it’s just a good reset. Plus, it’s just a good town. You run into people you know on the street, you have good conversations with people".

"I think distance plays a big factor for a lot of people. It’s too far to walk and it seems too far to bike. I take hundreds of people on 300 mile bike trips and we often do a bike to work day on the ride. 

The premise is everyone wears work clothes and we go ride 75 miles. If you can ride 75 miles down the California coast in your work clothes, you can bike to work when you get home. At a certain point biking or walking or taking a different form of transportation just becomes what you do!

 

“So we have this bike- it was an impulse buy at a bike shop in Seattle. It’s a cycle truck cargo bike and has a lower center of gravity front wheel and then a platform and when you turn the handle bars the platform stays level. My wife and I ride with our dog on the front. Anytime I take that thing out, people just smile and they point and they laugh. Sometimes I feel like I’m on a parade and it’s kind of silly but it brings people joy. They love it and she loves it”! 

“She just kind of balances up there. When I take the bike out of the shed, she gets so excited. If I’m using it just to go get dog food or chicken food and I don’t bring her, she gives me the stink eye”. 

RIDING THE BUS WITH ROCKY

“I go by the nickname Rocky. I live in the Westside neighborhood and I serve as a foster grandparent at a pre-school on Stephens so it’s the number 2 or 11 bus to downtown and then the 7. I do not have a car. I gave up my car in 2008 principally because well, I had three fender benders that year, and then I drove out to Seattle to visit my daughter and burned out the transmission. I’ve only driven once since that time. I’ve taken the bus consistently for the past 11 years. I really believe that public transportation is important".


“When I was moving out here from the Twin Cities, I came out and drove around and looked at a couple of options and found a place and thought, ‘This is a really nice place.’ And, furthermore, on my way there, I actually had to move out of the way so the bus could get around me, and I thought, ‘Well, hey, that’s handy!’ I really didn’t get a license that was worth anything until I lived in Minnesota, even though I got one when I was in high school, but that was in Missouri. You had to pass a written test, but you didn’t have to take a driving test! It cost 50 cents for my first license.”

"There are whole bunch of people, especially my generation, who are just spooked about riding the bus. The senior van, I take advantage of that a lot. For instance the first Thursday of the month is when Albertsons has their senior citizen discount day, 10% off your full purchase. I also use the senior van occasionally when I go give blood over at the center on Reserve. I suggest getting to know your bus driver by name and introduce yourself. I try to do that too, especially with the new crop we’re getting in, we’re always getting new drivers"

“Most of the drivers are so good and so reasonable. I really enjoy them. Randy of course, I get such a kick out of him. He’s actually been to Santa Claus school. I kid you not. His wife actually made his costume because if you buy them new I guess they cost something like 30K. When Halloween is here I dress up as the Queen of Autumn and he was dressed in this wild shirt one time with the circles around it. I’m very fond of the bus drivers. He’s just a great old friend”

WALKING WITH DANNY

"When we were looking for places to live, we just looked at neighborhoods that were walkable or bikeable, sort of subconsciously. We knew we didn’t want to deal with driving every day. It’s a big hassle and so we looked in neighborhoods that were closer in. For about 10-15 years, I’ve lived in cities, New York City, Washington D.C., where there’s great public transportation. I could never really fathom going to an existence where I’m driving back and forth every day and having to navigate traffic. I guess that sort of set the baseline for me- where life shouldn’t involve a morning commute and an afternoon commute. The decisions we’ve made since then have reflected that. My wife is from New York City so she’s not even that good at driving. I get stressed out when I’m in the passenger seat with her”.

Any advice for new sustainable commuters?


“Oh my gosh, yes! Spikes. Micro spikes [for your shoes]. Also, do it once, whether it’s planned or if it’s an emergency. For instance if your car breaks down or won’t start at the end of the day so you have to walk home or something like that. It’s kind of interesting because you realize that 2 miles, while it can seem like a lot because maybe you have to pass through two neighborhoods, is actually quite doable. And then you get home and you feel good because you’ve just walked two miles! Plus, there’s nothing more peaceful than listening to a podcast and walking”.

Has anything interesting happened during your commutes? 

“I was noticing today, whenever I commute with him by stroller, without fail, someone will stop me or someone will comment and say “oh you’re such a good dad”. And this doesn’t really have anything to do with commuting as much as it does about parenting but no one ever does that to my wife. I get congratulated all the time for just existing as a dad. One morning I was on the way to work, and there’s a McDonald’s at the bottom of the lower Rattlesnake and I stopped there because I wanted to get one of their breakfast sandwiches and one of their coffees. He was having a bad morning, blow out diaper, cranky, it was a little rough. I just wanted to get him out of the house and I was sitting there, he was probably asleep at this point and I was on my phone, with my coffee just like trying to stay sane and a guy came up to me and said “you are doing such a great job”. I was like I’m sitting here browsing twitter, sipping a McDonalds coffee, like drinking it over him, and I’m getting congratulated? My wife will be changing his diaper in the middle of a movie theater and no one will congratulate her. Just sitting here, before you arrived, I got congratulated by one guy for doing a good job. It’s unfair. That has nothing to do with commuting but it’s something I notice on my commute.”

 

What do you love about your commute?

 

“Honestly, you arrive to work a lot happier and you arrive back at home a lot happier. It makes me more productive and it makes me a better parent. I feel a difference walking with him in a stroller versus driving and arriving back home. I feel more ready to do stuff. More active."

CARPOOLING WITH SHAREEN

"When I first moved to town I lived off of Stephens and I walked to work. And then I moved to Miller Creek and I was just driving to work. Then two things coalesced for me to try using a sustainable mode. One was the Commuter Challenge, ya know, just wanting to try it. I looked on your website and found lots of options of people to potentially carpool with but I also knew my neighbors directly across the street from me also worked at the University. So we tried it for the week and I said “is this working for you, can we keep doing this?” So we’ve been carpooling every day together, it’s so easy and convenient. Plus, being new in town, I learn a lot from them about Missoula

and things going on on campus. I also get to enjoy the drive so much more. I get to look out the window and see the beautiful mountains and the beautiful river. Plus, I don’t lose my car! I would seriously often forget where I had parked my car 8 hours earlier. The other thing is my son is taking a break from college so he’s been using my car. By carpooling with my neighbors, we have no need for a second car. It’s been helpful on many fronts.

But it is nice to know that if they’re plans chance or if they go out of town, I can go online and see other carpool options. I checked it out and was pleased to see there were quite a few folks willing to carpool in my neighborhood. It does require a little more planning because I can’t stop at the store or run an errand after work but for the most part it’s very convenient.”

WALKING & BIKING WITH SINI & HEIKKI

Sini: "We’ve just used walking or biking or running since we moved here at the end of September. When we came here we decided not to buy a car here. At the time, our son was 9 months old and he didn’t enjoy sitting in a car at all. So when we moved here we decided to live 9 months without car because Missoula was advertised as a bicycle friendly city. We bought bicycles from Missoula and we brought a stroller from Finland that can be converted into a bicycle trailer. Here in town we have not used a car at all but we have rented a car when we want to go on longer trips.”

Heikki: "The trail in Missoula is very good and that has made it possible to live here without a car. Getting to University I think is much faster by bicycle than by car. And because the trail goes along the river, it’s really beautiful and relaxing. What I like very much for example is the bridge over Reserve Street because one time I tried to cross Reserve Street in another spot and it didn’t work at all. Without that bridge we would be much more stuck. And you can actually get pretty far! I’ve run all the way to Lolo. Even though it goes along the highways it’s still very beautiful. And through the winter, I was really surprised how well the trail stayed clear. But when you cannot get to your destination along the trail, it is just a nightmare. The sidewalks are really bumpy and not often clear of snow in winter. And you cannot even imagine cycling on those bike lanes with a baby in the trailer, it's just too dangerous."

BIKING WITH HEATHER

“I live on the Westside, and I commute to work which is just across the California Street Bridge. So I get to cross that bridge every single day, multiple times a day. I originally started commuting because my son got his drivers permit in 2004 and he started using my car. I’d been to Amsterdam and I loved how they rode their bikes over there and I was like I’m just gunna start riding and see how it goes”!

“Now my only drives are when I’m taking the pets to the vet or doing a big Costco run. I’ve even done Costco on the bike. It’s actually good self-control for going to Costco! I think a lot of people think it’s faster to drive but personally, I haven’t found that. Our system is really wonderful. Even over the past few years, all the connections we’ve made. You really can get from one place to another without hitting major roads. I don’t know if everybody realizes that”!

“There are so many benefits. The peace I feel riding across California Street Bridge every day is one. I see the heron and all the little ducks and the eagles sometimes and it’s just so enjoyable and great for my mental health. I love biking in the winter actually because I have to focus on staying upright on my bicycle. I just focus and think about staying safe on my bike and everything else disappears. And I do have a stressful job so it helps me release all of my stress from the day”.

“I live in the Rose Park neighborhood and commute to the River Trail. Before we had our son, I was biking 9 months out of the year and walking the other 3. On my commutes, I’ll listen to podcasts or talk to my friends or family. It really helps my sanity and I experience so many mental health benefits. Now that we have a son in day care 2 days a week, the car is coming out more often. We just started day care last week so we’re gunna see if there’s something we can do to bike him to day care or take the bus.

BIKING/WALKING WITH ALLISON

In general, we just don’t like having to drive. I find myself getting a little cranky when I do. When I’m on my bike or walking it’s just so much more pleasant. We are a two car family but one of them is 26 years old so we’re just gunna keep it as long as it lasts. My husband and I often carpool when getting out to trailheads. We’ll drive to the rattlesnake all together and my husband will go on a run and I’ll walk with our son and then we’ll switch off and I’ll run and he’ll walk.

Missoula is just so beautifully walker and biker friendly. We chose to live where we live because we can get to a lot of places by walking or biking. We’re not far from Ace Hardware and we’ve made sure that our eye doctor and our dentist are within walking distance. When I’m walking and biking I’m always amazed at how polite and aware most drivers are of pedestrians and bikers. I really appreciate that.”

Right now, my struggle is sustainably traveling with a kid. The daycare we use is near the Good Food Store and it just feels like a little bit of a distance for a bus route or a bike trailer but maybe that’s my challenge. If I do it once maybe I’ll realize it actually works and how easy it is. Maybe we just need to stretch ourselves a little bit by taking the bus or using the bike trailer once a week. We’ll start there.”​

“I live on the south end of town so it’s about 3 miles, 6 miles round trip. Most of it is on the Bitterroot Branch trail which goes right by my house plus 4th street which is pretty quiet. I counted it one day, because you do then when you’re biking, and I cross 16 roads. So I cross a lot of streets but I’m not on a lot of streets sharing the road with cars. But ya know, I’ve been kind of astonished, it’s maybe 5% of drivers that don’t stop for bikers. I think that’s really great.

BIKING WITH PAT

Around 1985, when I bought my bike, I bike commuted in Missoula all the time. And this was when the bike infrastructure was nothing like it is today. Then I moved away, out to Seattle and bike commuted there and then to D.C. and bike commuted there. Same bike has been with me across the country. And then I came back to Missoula and life just kind of happened and I just wasn’t biking as much. And honestly I just got into a habit. Ya know I had a place to park and driving just became my habit. Now our parking pressure at work has increased exponentially so there’s a lot of incentive not to drive. And then there was the Commuter Challenge and we had someone in our office organizing our team and I was like “huh, why am I not on my bike?

I needed that little incentive. Missoula is a place with incredible athletes, ultra-marathoners, bike racers, Olympic athletes, people that are just incredibly dedicated to being active, but I think most of us go to work, go to school, take care of kids, take care of family members and run errands. So if a gift certificate to Five on Black or competition with another office will get you on your bike, I think that’s great. I know I need that nudge and I imagine other people do too. In years past actually when the Commuter Challenge would end, I would go back to driving! But this year, I was committed to continue biking. I’m trying to make biking my norm.

I was biking all through September and I looked at my dashboard one day and was so impressed by how many days I had biked! Offering a way to measure your trips and reward yourself-- it seems so simple but it was just enough to get me over the hump and keep motivated. To challenge myself. And I know how much better I feel. The other day I had been sitting at my desk all day and I was really looking forward to my bike ride home. I felt so much better.

The other thing I’ve noticed in the last few years is more people are using the bike paths. Whether they’re pushing a stroller or walking or just hanging out, I always pass other people. I like that on the Bitterroot Branch there is so much diversity, not just the hyper athletes but there are people of every silo in Missoula. It’s sort of a more accurate cross section of Missoula than what you get from the Missoula promo videos and ads. I appreciate seeing people just doing their thing. I saw a women the other day on an old one speed going about 1 mph and she was just chugging away and I thought that’s great, I’m so glad you have a safe place to do that. And I like seeing the same people you wave to each day.

There are definitely some cold, wet and windy days but when people say ‘you’re not going to bike today are you?’ That gives me even more motivation to do it. I almost enjoy it more the more inclement the weather is. Sure, there are some slight inconveniences. Like on days when I know I have to run a lot of errands. And then you have to factor in the helmet hair. Like ‘wait a minute, I have a meeting with a funder at 4pm, can I do 2 errands in between? By then I’ll have serious helmet hair…’ Sometimes my schedule or the weather just isn’t favorable to biking and that’s ok. I do it whenever I can!

The bike I’m using now, I bought in 1985. It was the first bike I ever bought and I’m still riding it. I was bike commuting back then here in Missoula. Back then, there was little bike infrastructure, you really had to be a defensive bike rider. So this bike is 34 years old. It’s older than many of my coworkers! It has the oval shaped sprocket that was supposed to be super-efficient. It was some crazy gimmick that turned out to be bogus but that bike has been vandalized in D.C., and gotten me up hills in Seattle. And it’s about 400lbs. It’s funny because I’ve gone biking with friends and they put all the bikes up on the roof and then they get to mine and they struggle because it’s so darn heavy! But it gives me a heck of a workout.

Biking felt like a way to sneak in some physical activity and get into shape. It’s a 6 mile ride to and back from work so it’s not like some epic mountain ride that I can brag on Facebook about but I thought just get on your bike, just try it. The other day I was just not feeling up for biking but I told myself “just get on your bike, just turn the pedal and let things happen”. And I start to notice and appreciate so much about my route. There are little single tracks off the bike path where I get my mountain biking in. I see deer in the morning and Hickory and 4th Street have the most gorgeous trees. I also do a lot of writing for my job so it’s my chance to work out stuff. It gives me that physical break from sitting in a chair, staring at my computer. You get new insights. It’s a nice coda after your work day and in between the rest of your day. Plus you just feel better, you feel stronger.”

CARPOOLING

WITH DARCEY

“We live in Potomac, up the Blackfoot, and commute to three different neighborhoods in town. My husband works downtown, our kiddo goes to school in midtown and then my office is just off Mount. Every morning we all pile in together. Usually my husband drives in the morning and we get to his office, swap out and say our goodbyes. Then I drop our son off at school and head to work. I usually keep the vehicle at work because I’m kind of the errand runner in the family.

When we first moved to Potomac, we were in major transition. We had a new baby and he struggled in the car. It was really tough, so at first commuting was a moral support thing - we were going through the challenges together! Plus, the idea of driving two vehicles into town 4 or 5 days a week was ridiculous financially. Eventually our son grew out of it and we’re all still together and we’re all still carpooling! Starting that new routine with that transition was super helpful.

 

The other piece is that when you have small children and work, time with them is kind of limited and that’s really a bummer. There is an unintended, yet beautiful benefit from carpooling which allows us all to spend an uninterrupted hour together everyday. Some of the conversations we have are super fascinating. Our son is only 3 but I can imagine as he gets older, it’ll be a time for us to really connect. On the way into town, we plan our days. On the way home, we talk about the highs and lows of our days. By the time we’re home there is some separation from our work lives and our home lives and we can just be a family. It does require a little more planning and preparation but overall the positives far outweigh the challenges.”

“I live near the Orange Street Food Farm and commute to campus by bus or bike pretty much every day. I take the purple line all the time. Before that, I was just relying on my bike but I recently developed some tendinitis, I’m in in the ceramics program at the University, so I couldn’t ride my bike any more. Taking the bus is great because it makes me walk more than I normally would. It gives me more of workout. I use the app a lot which tells me where the bus is in real time. That’s super helpful and I’d recommend people getting that, especially if they're just starting out.

RIDING THE BUS/ BIKING WITH

BRADY

Nothing all that interesting happens on my bus rides but I will say I’ve ridden the bus in multiple cities and it seems that the bus drivers in Missoula are by far the nicest."

BIKING WITH ELIZABETH

Elizabeth (Mom): “As a family, we mainly bus and bike. We’ve kind of scaled it back because of our lives right now but whenever we can, we get on the bus or ride our bikes. One benefit we experience is my mood. And my kids mood. If they’re outside and riding their bikes rather than being cooped up, they’re much happier. I remember when we were biking a lot, there were these little epiphanies that they would say. I remember Astrid being able to voice this thought of “I just love the smells you smell, the things you hear, the things you see.

A couple years ago we made a pact that we would see how many days in a row we could bike to school. After 40 days I got them a little prize and then after 60 days I got them t-shirts from Missoula In Motion and glasses that had a bike on it. Part of the reason we did that was selfish. I was training for an adventure race and needed to put some miles in. Instead of elevation, I was training with weight. I was hauling these guys around 60-90 miles a week. And I just wanted to bike every single place we went and just got into this routine of doing it. I’ve been in the habit of doing it since my first daughter was really little. I bought the bike trailer when she was a year old. So selfish reasons at first and then I just loved it. I felt so strong. My girls would cheer me on from the trailer like “you can make this hill mom”! And then they started biking on their own. We are quite a team. I tell my kids you have to give energy to get it back."

 

Astrid (daughter): “I bike to school almost every day. I love that you just feel free and that you can go anywhere. If the parking lot is full, you don’t have to worry about it"!

I’m working from home now but prior to this I took the bus #4 from East Missoula. I pick it up at the end of my street and get off in front of Albertsons and walk across the bridge onto campus. The bus works really great for me. Before they built the new Missoula College campus, that parking lot used to be a park and ride lot. I would drive there each morning so I didn’t have to buy a parking pass or spend the time looking for a parking spot. But when the park and ride wasn’t an option I looked into the Mountain Line bus and it’s worked great ever since.

TELEWORKING

WITH WENDY

The #4 is usually a pretty full route. It’s mostly all the same people that ride that route every morning and every afternoon. I’m actually really missing riding the bus because I miss these people. I want to know how everyone is doing, ya know they're my friends! I miss taking the bus and I miss all that walking.

 

I’ve been teleworking since March 16th. My department has always been really great about me working from home here and there and have always given me remote access so even if I’m not in the office or out of Missoula, I can work.  I feel really lucky that I can work from home but there are definitely challenges. I worked for about a week, actually I don’t even know if I made it to the end of the week, before I needed to go into my office and get some of my office equipment. Our IT department gave me an extra monitor, I brought my office chair home, my contoured keyboard, and my super funky stand up mouse which is better for my wrist. My home isn't set up for working from home so I had to do that. After I did that, my direct supervisor went to the office and got all her stuff too. It makes a big difference.

 

I’m part of the student services office in the College of Forestry. Within our team, we have a weekly meeting to check in, hear what’s been going on, make each other laugh a little bit and just keep in touch. Processes are constantly changing so we have those weekly meetings to stay on the same page. It’s also just nice to see other peoples faces. Plus everyone brings their dogs onto the video which is fun.

 

What I've done is try to stick to my routines as much as I can. I still set my alarm every morning, granted it’s a little later than normal because I don’t need to catch a bus and walk onto campus, but I still get up, get in the shower, do my hair, do my makeup, put work clothes on. I’m trying to keep my routine as normal as possible on my work days because if I don’t, there’s no way to differentiate between waking up on a Saturday and waking up on a Tuesday morning. Keeping a routine helps me maintain two different modes to switch between. And I still set times throughout my day to take breaks. When on campus, I would walk around the oval. While at home, we’ve got a baseball diamond across the street so I take the dogs and spend 10 to 15 minutes to get up and get moving.

 

For the most part working from home has worked really well. It’s really nice having the dogs around so often. This guy stands on the arm of the chair until I pick him up.

"I'm just finishing up week 2 of telework, and before I started I happened to see a twitter thread with some really great advice in it. I wish I could find it again and share it, or at least credit the person but sadly I haven't been able to.

Here are the things that have helped me the most:

1. Keep your routines as much as possible. Specifically, get up at the same time. Shower. Get dressed in clothes that aren't just PJs. (There's wiggle room here.). As much as you can, do your normal morning routine.

TELEWORKING

WITH JONI

2. If you're someone who is used to commuting, do something to simulate the commute. If you think about it, that time is often when you switch from "home" to "work" mode. You think about the things on your To Do list and get yourself mentally ready for the day. Personally, I've been going for a walk and will keep doing that as long as we're allowed to. I walk out my door, decide which direction to go, decide how long I want to take and then set a timer on my phone for half that amount of time, to remind me to turn around. That way I don't have to watch the time, I just go and then turn around when it goes off. When I get back, I do change into lounge-pants. I find them more comfortable and less distracting, and I think that's okay.

 

3. If you can set yourself up with a standing workstation, do. Take sit-breaks as needed, but a standing workstation will keep you from losing yourself in your work and forgetting to get up for movement, food, water, etc.

 

4. Take breaks. Get yourself some tea. Walk around. Stretch and move. Do mini squats or whatever works for you.

 

5. Take a lunch break. I've always been a working lunch sort of person, but right now I'm making the effort to step away. I go for a walk for the first part of my lunch break, then I come back and eat my lunch before hopping back online.

 

6. Consider simulating your commute again after you log out for the night. Again, I go for a walk and will keep doing that as long as we're allowed. It just helps me wind down and log my brain out of work the way I logged out of my computer.

7. Consider doing the same sort of food-prep you normally do. If you make a big set of meals at the weekend, to take to work, do that. It saves time and mental energy on your lunch break, which is really nice.

 

8. Fight the urge to sleep in too late and roll out of bed straight to work. It will be a very attractive idea, but it doesn't lend itself to good focus and productivity. Also, skipping showers may seem fine if you're on your own, but when you let yourself get gross, you feel gross mentally too. Same with oral hygiene.

 

9. Don't add too many new things to your routine at once. That'll get overwhelming fast. Focus on the most important things and then gradually add on.

 

10. Don't try to do everything perfectly from the first day. Start with the most important tasks and add in new tasks as you get more comfortable with your new routine. Trying to do it all at once can be too overwhelming.

 

11. Be gentle with yourself. It's not easy adapting to such different routines, especially when coping with uncertainty, anxiety and even grief. Try to be kind and gentle with yourself, emotionally and physically.

 

12. Reach out to friends. Set up skype or zoom calls. Even phone calls. Make sure your friends know you care about and value them, even if you can't see them right now. Same with family.

 

13. Consider giving yourself a day or two to really sit in your feelings about the situation we're in. Let yourself feel that grief and anxiety. Acknowledge it. Don't run from it or keep pushing it away for too long. That may bring on an unavoidable breakdown, and you don't need that. Most of all, take care of yourself and your family. It's okay to binge watch tv or play video games or read a lot or whatever helps you escape for a bit. Don't be too hard on yourself or others for those pursuits.

 

14. Help others if you can. Helping friends, family and even strangers who are vulnerable can be very helpful to our own mental and emotional well being. Check in before you do your grocery shopping and ask if you can drop anything off for them so they don't have to go out themselves. Helping can make us feel better and protecting our vulnerable loved ones is especially important."

How long have you been commuting this way and how often do you sustainably commute?

Forever! Okay, actually, over the past 25 years in all of the places I’ve lived. Unless winter interferes, I ride my bike, but I’ve walked, bused and trained to work. I’ve never had a commute where I drove every day. In fact, I never even owned a car before this past year.

 

What are some benefits you've experienced from choosing sustainable transportation?

BIKING WITH

JENNY

I once made a rough calculation of how much money I DIDN’T spend, by not owning a car. Over twenty years, not having car payments, insurance, gas and maintenance, saved me well over $100,000. So that’s a benefit, but I also think it’s a much nicer way to start a day going for a walk or a bike ride than it is sitting in a car or sitting in traffic.

What are some transportation improvements you'd like to see?

I think Missoula has a great trail system, and I appreciate that snow is cleared from the trails as quickly as it is cleared from roads. I would love to see on-street bike lanes separated from traffic by more than a line painted on the road. Installing that infrastructure is expensive, but I believe Missoula will get there!

BIKING WITH TIM

We live in East Missoula and I commute to St. Pats 3 days a week all year round. Whenever we move, we tried to live within a 5 miles radius of where we work. When we moved to Missoula, we literally took a map and drew a 3 miles radius around St Patrick Hospital. We wound up living about 3.8 and 3.7 miles away from our workplaces. We really wanted to position ourselves so that commuting by bike was always a reasonable option. Once you start pushing past 5 miles then it becomes a little more difficult and a little harder of a decision to bike everyday. It’s not as easy to just pick up and go when it gets beyond a 5 mile commute. When we were in Hamilton, we lived 4 miles from the hospital, and my ride was quite a bit easier because it was all back roads. Not as much interactions with other cars, stop lights, intersections, etc.

Route 200 from East Missoula is fine. Once you get past the railroad death trap, there’s actually a sidewalk that runs all the way into town. In the winter, it’s usually not plowed when I’m going to work at 6 in the morning but that’s totally fine, I don't expect it to be. With the bike I have it’s actually pretty smooth riding on snow. The overall commute is pretty easy.

I really enjoy cycling and I really enjoy being able to incorporate not only transportation but exercise. Like today as I was biking into town, I didn’t have to feel guilty about not going to the gym or getting a workout in because I was using my bike. Killing two birds with one stone.

When I talk to people and they say “oh my gosh, I can’t believe you do that”, I try to reframe the conversation and ask them “well how long does it take you to drive X amount of miles”? For me, if I were to drive to St. Pats, find a parking space, walk to the door, it would literally only save me a few minutes, maybe 5 at the most to drive. Plus, biking saves me money and prevents additional wear and tear on my vehicle. The inconsistency and uncertainty of having to find a parking spot is really stressful and can take lots of time. When I bike I don’t have to deal with that.

How long have you been using the bus to commute?

Claire: “I’ve been commuting on the bus for a long time. For probably 5 or more years.”

Logan: “Since it became free for me. It’s cheaper to do this and my car broke down not too long ago so I decided to just get rid of it.”

RIDING THE BUS WITH LOGAN

& CLAIRE

Claire: “I refuse to get my driver’s license because I’d prefer not to own a car. The buses are free and they’re already running so it makes sense.”

What are some benefits of taking the bus?

Claire: “I’ve experienced more free time and its good people watching. I recommend getting the app and getting a paper map just in case your phone is dead or the internet is down. I was nervous when I took the bus for the first time. I did it alone. I wanted to just get out of the house so I decided to take a bus downtown. I just walked around downtown by myself. It was awesome!”

What’s the weirdest story from your commute?

Logan: “Umm, one time when I got on there was a woman who had a messenger bag full of Guinea pigs that she was trying to give away. She tried giving them away but nobody wanted them. I thought about it but I could not take care of a Guinea pig. It was just the weirdest thing.”

ROLLER SKATING

WITH KARI

In general, I’ve chosen to live in places where I didn't have to rely on my car. That was always intentional. The house I recently bought, I was really patient for because I wanted to be on the bike trail. I prioritized that and waited. I would say I like to roller skate the best. Skating just feels simpler. I can throw them in my backpack and take them anywhere. And sometimes I’m going just as fast or faster, than bikers. I also sometimes wear them into the grocery store and people won’t realize until they look at me and say “Kari, you look taller today”.

“I feel the most whole when I skate. I think because I learned to do it at such a young age. I don’t know what it is, but it’s just such an integral part of my identity. I feel so fully connected when I skate. Sometimes when I’m skating, people will cheer for me. In my first year here, I joined Hellgate Roller Derby. At one point, it was summer time and we all went out, I don’t know maybe 20 or so of us, and we were all skating around and people were cheering us on and applauding from their balconies. I think it’s a nostalgia thing for some people. People will stop and smile and cheer and then I get all these emotions from making them happy. We have this connection like, “I know you skated as a kid and you’re flashing back to those moments”. There’s this weird shared interaction that I get from skating.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram

@2020 Missoula In Motion

435 Ryman St. 

Missoula, MT 59802
mim@missoulainmotion.com

406 - 552 - 6675